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This is How the Philippines Fares in Women’s Issues Compared to the Rest of the World

By Focus FeaturesMarch 5, 2017

top-ten-locations

Global Gender Gap Index 2016 Top Ten

Rank

Country

1

Iceland. For the eighth consecutive year, Iceland takes the number one spot as it closes more than 87 percent of its overall gender gap.Iceland also grabbed the top spot on Political Empowerment and belongs to the top 10 on Economic Participation and Opportunity. It still has some work to do though on wage equality.
Since 2006, Iceland has closed approximately 12 percent of its total gender gap.

2

Finland. Finland performed marvelously on several criteria, closing its gender gap on Educational Attainment and Health and Survival and decreasing the gap on Political Empowerment as more women attain ministerial positions.
Like Iceland, it still has some work to do on wage equality.

3

Norway. Norway went down a spot in 2016. It performed well in terms of wage equality and political empowerment. Its Health and Survival gender gap, however, widened slightly since 2015.

4

Sweden. While its position on the Economic Participation and Opportunity subindex remains strong because of the increase on the number of female legislators, senior officials, and managers, it dropped a rank on the Political Empowerment subindex.

5

Rwanda. Rwanda breaks into the top five for the first time since the GGGI was created mostly because of improvements on its Economic Participation and Opportunity subindex. It’s good to note that it is the country with the highest share of female parliamentarians in the world at 64 percent.

6

Ireland. Ireland dropped out of the top five mainly because of the decline on its Economic Participation and Opportunity score. It has fully closed its gender gap on Educational Attainment, however, and made strides on its Political Empowerment score, with more women in parliament.

7

Philippines. The Philippines maintains its ranking. It did suffer a slight decline in its overall score which may be attributed to a lower Economic Participation and Opportunity subindex score, caused by fewer female legislators, senior officials, and managers. But it has fully closed its gender gap on the Health and Survival subindex and has fully re-closed its Educational Attainment gender gap after a re-opening for the first time in 2015.

8

Slovenia. Slovenia is one of the fastest-improving countries in the world, having closed 16 percent of its gender gap since 2006. It made strides on the Economic Participation and Opportunity subindex and wage equality. Its Educational Attainment and Health and Survival subindexes, however, have yet to be fully closed.

9

New Zealand. With more women in the workplace, New Zealand improves its position on Economic Participating and Opportunity subindex, pushing up its overall ranking. It still has to work on its Health and Survival gender gap, however, as well as its Educational Attainment gender gap.

10

Nicaragua Nicaragua is the best performer in the Latin America and the Caribbean region for the fifth year in a row. While it has fully closed the gender gap on the Educational Attainment and Health and Survival indexes, it ranks 92nd on the Economic Participation and Opportunity subindex. Nevertheless it has closed 19 percent of its overall gender gap since 2006.

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Global Gender Gap Index

What do these numbers mean? Women may be as educated as men, and may even live longer, but they are not as economically empowered. If you compare the country’s rank in 2006 to 2016, the country dropped from sixth to 21st in the economic participation and opportunity index. So more men are getting hired over women, and are getting paid more, too. Men also dominate the field of politics and governance.

2016 rank

2006 rank

Global Gender Gap Index

7

6

Economic participation and opportunity

57

68

Health and survival

1

1

Political empowerment

17

16

How educated are we?

Male

Female

Literacy rate, percentage of population aged 15 years and over who can both read and write and understand a short simple statement

96.00%

97.00%

Primary education enrollment rate, percentage of the total population in that age group

94.00%

98.00%

Secondary education enrolment rate, percentage of the total population in that age group

62.00%

74.00%

Tertiary enrollment rate*

31.00%

40.00%

Primary education attainment rate, percentage of applicable population

82.00%

86.00%

Secondary education attainment rate

57.00%

60.00%

Tertiary education attainment rate

15%

9.00%

Tertiary-level graduates in STEM studies

35.00%

15.00%

* Total enrollment in tertiary education, regardless of age, expressed as a percentage of the population of the five-year age group starting from the official secondary school graduation age.

labor-participation
earnings-and-savings
percent-of-violence

Is it safe to get pregnant

“Over the course of 25 years, the maternal mortality rate has gone all across the world. On average, the maternal mortality rate has decreased from 385 per 100,000 live births in 1990 to 216 in 2015.

In the same period, the maternal mortality rate of the Philippines decreased from 152 to 114 per 100,000 live births. While these numbers are well below the world averages, there is still much room for improvement in comparison to its neighbors in East Asia and the Pacific.”

SOURCE: WHO, UNICEF, UNFPA, World Bank Group, and the United Nations Population Division. Trends in Maternal Mortality: 1990 to 2015. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2015
(http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SH.STA.MMRT)

WHY ARE WE LOSING OUR MOTHERS?

Complications occuring during the course of labor, childbirth, and puerperium remain the primary cause of death among Filipino mothers. The actual number of deaths caused by conditions related to hypertension, however, has been rising. Puerperium refers to the period of six weeks after childbirth when the mother’s reproductive organs return to their pre-pregnancy condition.

PHILIPPINE MATERNAL DEATH RATE BY MAIN CAUSE, 1990 to 2010

Year

Primary cause

Secondary Cause

1990

Postpartum Hemorrhage

Normal Delivery and other complications related to pregnancy occuring in the course of labor, delivery, and puerperium

1991

Postpartum Hemorrhage

Hypertension complicating pregnancy,
childbirth, and puerperium

1992

Normal Delivery and Other complications related to pregnancy occuring in the course of labor, delivery, and puerperium

Hypertension complicating pregnancy,
childbirth, and puerperium

1993

Normal Delivery and Other complications related to pregnancy occuring in the course of labor, delivery, and puerperium

Hypertension complicating pregnancy,
childbirth, and puerperium

1994

Normal Delivery and Other complications related to pregnancy occuring in the course of labor, delivery, and puerperium

Hypertension complicating pregnancy,
childbirth, and puerperium

1995

Other complications related to pregnancy occuring in the course of labor, delivery, and
puerperium

Hypertension complicating pregnancy,
childbirth, and puerperium

1996

Normal Delivery and Other complications related to pregnancy occuring in the course of labor, delivery, and puerperium

Hypertension complicating pregnancy

1997

Normal Delivery and Other complications related to pregnancy occuring in the course of labor, delivery, and puerperium

Hypertension complicating pregnancy,
childbirth, and puerperium

1998 to 2010

Other complications related to pregnancy occuring in the course of labor, delivery, and puerperium

Hypertension complicating pregnancy,
childbirth, and puerperium

SOURCE: Philippine Department of Health
Maternal Death Rate by Main Cause, data from 1990 to 2010

How Long do we Live?

Female

Male

Philippine healthy life expectancy

63

72

World life expectancy

57

68

The many ways to die

Age-standardized deaths per 100,000 of the population

Cause of death

Female

Male

Cardiovascular disease

305

464

Cancer

85

114

Diabetes

61

66

Chronic respiratory disease

35

97

Suicide

1

5